Malaria Diagnostics Team Publishes Paper in Lab on a Chip

The paper – A Paper Microfluidic Cartridge for Automated Staining of Malaria Parasites with an Optically Transparent Microscopy Window – discusses the work behind our microfluidic cartridge for automated staining of malaria parasites.

A) A 3D view of cartridge showing blood being dispensed from the left, acridine orange dye filled paper where staining occurs, and the unobstructed, transparent coverslip region where imaging is conducted via microscopy. B) A top-down view of the cartridg

IV Lab’s Malaria Diagnostics team recently published a paper in the journal Lab on a Chip. The paper – A paper microfluidic cartridge for automated staining of malaria parasites with an optically transparent microscopy window – discusses the work behind our microfluidic cartridge for automated staining of malaria parasites.

ABSTRACT

A paper microfluidic cartridge for the automated staining of malaria parasites (Plasmodium) with acridine orange prior to microscopy is presented. The cartridge enables simultaneous, sub-minute generation of both thin and thick smears of acridine orange stained parasites. Parasites are stained in a cellulose matrix, after which the parasites are ejected via capillary forces into an optically transparent chamber. The unique slanted design of the chamber ensures that a high percentage of the stained blood will be of the required thickness for a thin smear, without resorting to spacers or other methods that can increase production cost or require tight quality controls. A hydrophobic snorkel facilitates the removal of air bubbles during filling. The cartridge contains both a thin smear region, where a single layer of cells is presented unobstructed, for ease of species identification, and a thick smear region, containing multiple cell layers, for enhanced limit of detection.