The Institute for Disease Modeling is committed to improving and saving lives in developing countries through the use of quantitative analysis.

As part of Intellectual Ventures’ Global Good initiative, the Institute for Disease Modeling (IDM) is committed to improving and saving lives in developing countries through the use of quantitative analysis. IDM focuses on creating powerful and innovative disease modeling and data analysis tools to help researchers and policy makers understand diseases and evaluate the efficacy of eradication and control alternatives. IDM’s advancements in modeling provide a unique understanding of the spread of disease and of alternative eradication strategies. IDM’s flagship modeling software, EMOD, supports disease campaign planning, data gathering, new product development, and helps evaluate policy decisions.

To further enhance those efforts, IDM partners with selected universities, NGOs, government ministries, and other research and public health institutions focused on researching new ways to understand and combat diseases both locally and globally.

Dedicated Research

The Institute for Disease Modeling has grown from a small IV Lab project with a handful of researchers dedicated to malaria research to an independent center for disease modeling that now encompasses four generic disease transmission types spanning several diseases.

Global Good

Malaria Diagnostics

IV Lab is developing new malaria diagnostic techniques in support of elimination and eventual eradication of malaria.

Optical TB Diagnostics

IV Lab is developing novel optical detection methods for automated identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

Photonic Fence

One potential use of the Photonic Fence is to create a virtual fence that detects insects as they cross its plane.

Artificial Diet

IV Lab is developing an artificially manufactured mosquito food to help scientists and health programs raise mosquitoes effectively.

Passive Vaccine Storage Device

Our passive vaccine storage device keeps vaccines cold for a month or more to extend vaccination services in developing countries.

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